Adam Doleac: Barstool Whiskey Wonderland Tour

– ALL AGES- STANDING ROOM ONLY- VIP PACKAGES AVAILABLE BY CLICKING HERE AND INCLUDE:   VIP Laminate   Barstool Whiskey Wonderland Snowglobe   30 Minute Q&A and Acoustic Performance   Meet and Greet Photo   ADAM DOLEAC It takes time to craft a debut album. One worthy of the artist it introduces, and all the work behind it. But for Arista Nashville/Sony Music Nashville’s Adam Doleac, he’s had plenty. “I’ve had my whole life to write my first record, plus a two-year pandemic,” he says with a wry smile. “So that’s like two lifetimes.” Luckily, he made the clock work for him. Creating a whole Barstool Whiskey Wonderland around 18 addictive tracks – almost totally from his own pen – the emerging star unveils a vision steeped in the romantic country soul of his early hits, while going much deeper as well. With tracks like the Gold-certified “Famous” and soul-mate anthem “Another,” both of which hit No. 1 on SiriusXM’s The Highway, fans have gotten only a glimpse of that wonderland so far. Now they get the full picture. “It feels long overdue, and it’s the first time people can really see the whole me,” Doleac says. “An album is a cool thing. It allows you to tell a little bit more of your story, as opposed to just people knowing a song and not knowing you.” And for him, a lover of all things old-school with an effortless charm and an intoxicating vocal – well suited to both champagne-popping ballrooms and keg-tapping taverns – that story is worth telling. Raised in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, you could call him a late musical bloomer, who credits devoted parents for his strong work ethic … and his dream-chasing determination.ALANA SPRINGSTEEN I’m alana! I was born and raised in VA Beach so I am a beach girl at heart! Ever since I can remember, I’ve been in love with music. I grew up singing in my Grandad’s church and everywhere we went, he would tell everyone, “ You gotta hear this girl sing!” So that’s what I did. 🙂  Everywhere I went, I was singing.  I got my first guitar when I was 7 years old. I was so drawn to it and all I knew was that I HAD to have it and I HAD to learn to play. My uncle would come over on weekends and teach me chords and strumming patterns and I was obsessed!  After a few years, I began putting lyrics to music. I wrote my first song when I was 9 and was instantly in love with telling my own stories. The more I wrote, the more I realized that it was what I was born to do.

PATIO: Adrianne Blanks & The Oracles

– ALL AGES- PATIO SEATING IS FIRST COME FIRST SERVEDADRIANNE BLANKS & THE ORACLESAdrianne Blanks & The Oracles are an Asheville based trio, comprised of vocals, guitar, keyboard, and bass, often singing in tight three part harmony. Musical influences, Rhiannon Giddens and Dolly Parton, this trio plays folk and vintage country. After a fully funded Kickstarter, this witchy woman released her debut EP, “Words Are Spells” this August. She has had the good fortune to play all around Western North Carolina and beyond, including the Asheville, Chattanooga, and Nashville Vegan Fests, Arbor Evenings at the North Carolina Arboretum, and Asheville FM 103.3. Her song “Tell me You Love Me” has been played on WNCW 88.7. Follow her on Spotify to hear her latest releases, and head to www.adrianneblanks.com to sign up to the Adrianne Blanks email list for upcoming show dates.

POSTPONED: PATIO: The Black Twig Pickers

– ALL AGES- PATIO SEATING IS FIRST COME FIRST SERVEDTHE BLACK TWIG PICKERSThe Black Twig Pickers are a group defined by their forward thinking approach to a type of music most often associated with times gone by. Over the course of eight full-length records, including collaborative releases with Jack Rose and Charlie Parr, a split LP with Glenn Jones, and numerous EPs and singles, the group has established itself as a collection of dedicated practioners of old time music re-cast and shaped by their appreciation of modern improvisation, drone, and punk. While not at odds with the experimental scene that has fostered them or the old time circles they travel in, The Black Twig Pickers thrive in the in-betweenness of those two worlds, proving that the exploration of the outmost bounds of sound and the exploration of decades old tradition and community aren’t as different as one might think.Rough Carpenters, which was recorded in the same two-day session as 2012’s Whompyjawed EP, can be seen as an inward-gazing foil to that EP’s long-form hoedown epics. With the addition of Sally Anne Morgan on fiddle to the trio of Mike Gangloff, Isak Howell, and Nathan Bowles, dance has become a more prominent part of the group’s formula. It wasn’t until Morgan joined the band that the band actually began to dance onstage. Also, on this album the group strays a bit farther outside their intensely local Southwest Virginia tradition than earlier records, incorporating a few more tunes with origins in Kentucky (“Banks of the Arkansas”) and West Virginia (“Little Rose”). The group’s repertoire is constantly growing as they turn to first-person sources, older musicians that were brought up in the old time scene and in some cases the children and families of deceased respected practitioners, and unreleased archival recordings passed among musicians. And while local and regional history is ever present in the music The Black Twig Pickers play, they turn songs that are many decades old into living artifacts, released from the restrictions of era by the personal convictions of the musicians.This spirit of ecstatic abandon is conveyed through the percussive elements of The Black Twig Pickers’ music and more importantly, through a spontaneity and an unrehearsedness the band wears as a badge of pride. As Gangloff explains, “It’s not the melody, it’s the moss.” The sharp twang of the banjo, a spontaneous holler, a foot stomping along in time, and other seemingly incidental sounds become all important. Like the band’s previous Thrill Jockey full-length Ironto Special, Rough Carpenters was recorded with absolutely no overdubs and in as few takes as possible. The Black Twig Pickers are indeed rough carpenters, building unpolished but finely crafted records that embody the spirit of a timeless old-time scene.Isak Howell — guitar, mouth harp, vocals Mike Gangloff — fiddle, banjo, vocals Nathan Bowles — banjo, washboard, bones, fiddlesticks, banjosticks, vocals Sally Anne Morgan — fiddle, hambone, vocals With Joseph Dejarnette — bass and vocals