The Grey Eagle 25th Anniversary Celebration at Lake Eden

The Grey Eagle & Worthwhile Sounds Present

The Grey Eagle 25th Anniversary Celebration at Lake Eden

Mandolin Orange, The Budos Band, James McMurtry, of Montreal, Hayes Carll, The Suffers, Drivin N Cryin, UNKNOWN HINSON, Kurtis Blow, Sierra Hull

Sat, June 29, 2019

12:00 pm

$75 Advance / $85 DOS / $150 VIP / $40 Youth

This event is all ages

Lineup • FAQ • Vendors + more >> thegreyeagleanniversary.com

VIP TICKETS AVAILABLE!
VIP tickets includes:
• (1) VIP Admission Ticket
• Early Site Access
• (1) Camping Pass
• (1) Parking Pass
• Sunday Breakfast
• (1) Ticket To Sunday Private Show (TBA)
• (1) 25th Anniversary Poster

The Grey Eagle 25th Anniversary Celebration
The Grey Eagle 25th Anniversary Celebration
Mandolin Orange • The Budos Band
James McMurtry • of Montreal
Hayes Carll• The Suffers • Drivin N Cryin
Unknown Hinson • Kurtis Blow • Sierra Hull

Join us as we celebrate The Grey Eagle's 25th anniversary at Lake Eden in Black Mountain, NC with a full day of music.

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The Grey Eagle Tavern and Music Hall was first located in Black Mountain, North Carolina. Its name came from the old Cherokee name for that region and the original name of the town. Originally housed in 1994 in a former garage and paint room of a former Chevrolet dealership, The Grey Eagle became one of those comfortable neighborhood bars, hosting local musicians and some touring songwriters.

In the fall of 1998, The Grey Eagle bid farewell to Black Mountain with a momentous Halloween show and moved a scant 12 miles away with a beautiful new venue by the French Board River in historic Asheville. June 11, 1999 saw the inaugural with a show from an old friend, David LaMotte.

Today the Grey Eagle is Asheville’s longest-running all-ages venue and has hosted over 10,000 different bands and artists including Ralph Stanley, Avett Brothers, Band of Horses, Richie Havens, Frank Black, Deen Ween, Lake Street Dive, Slick Rick, Nathaniel Ratcliff, Sharon Jones and the Dap Kings, Budos Band, Darrell Scott, and many more. Equally impressive is the long list of local talents performing in a setting featuring a large dance floor, relaxing patio area, and one of the best sound systems in Asheville. The performance room boasts an intimate stage with options for seated shows, 2 flat-screen TVs and projector. To complete the hospitable atmosphere is an in-house Taqueria featuring original and creative meals and an ever-expanding beer selection.

The Grey Eagle continues to garner local and national acclaim. The intimacy of the stage offers a personal experience between the musicians and the audience. In March, David Dye hosted the NPR series World Cafe’s “Sense of Place” show at The Grey Eagle. For these and other reasons The Grey Eagle was voted by touring musicians as one of the nation’s top 25 live music venues and in 2016, by Garden and Gun magazine, as one of “Ten Must-See Music Venues in the Southeast.”
Mandolin Orange
Mandolin Orange
North Carolina, US based Folk duo of Andrew Marlin & Emily Frantz. Formed in 2009 in Chapel Hill, NC.
The Budos Band
The Budos Band
When it came time to title their new album, one decision was easy: "This isn't The Budos Band IV," proclaims drummer Brian Profilio. "This isn't just more of the same." The Budos Band embarked on an experimental journey since the release of The Budos Band III in 2010, seeking inspiration from sources far and wide.

While wizards use books of spells and alchemy to mix their masterful potions, the Budos employ heavy doses of continent-spanning psychedelic rock to beckon the occult and conjure the supernatural. Hence the title of the band's fourth album: Burnt Offering.

"We made a conscious decision to embark on a new sound," explains baritone saxophone player Jared Tankel. The heavy, trippy side the group unveiled on The Budos Band III reaches full flower on new tunes like "Aphasia," "Trouble in the Sticks" and particularly the title track "Burnt Offering." "We were messing around with an old Binson Echorec at practice one night and this loop emerged," recalls bassist Dan Foder. The droning fuzz guitar is a call to the gods from below and encapsulates the band's sonic progression perfectly. "This record is fuzzy, buzzy and raw, and more obviously psychedelic," adds Profilio.

Like a cratedigger's classic from a parallel universe, "Tomahawk" melds heavy, distorted guitar riffs with bright blasts of brass and bubbling drums. An eerie, ceremonial vibe awakens the slumbering giant "Into The Fog" and prods it to life.

Driven by melodies, rhythms, and changes that animate muscle and bone to move, yet compel the ear to lean in closer, these full-bodied instrumentals push Budos' music deeper into new territory.

All lingering traces of touchstones of yore—be they Fela Kuti, Dyke and the Blazers, or Black Sabbath—have been wholly absorbed and filtered through the Budos Band's ever-evolving aesthetic. "We sound nothing like our first record anymore," confirms Profilio. Anyone content to just slap the old "Staten Island Afro-soul" tag on Burnt Offering and move on clearly didn't listen to the music first.

The group composed more than two dozen songs in the course of making Burnt Offering, yet only recorded fifteen, further distilling its essence to ten classic cuts for the full-length release. If a new tune failed to capture the rambunctious energy of their live show, if it revised familiar territory or obvious influences, it got cut. Budos was determined to break new ground. "If any band says that's easy to do, they're fooling themselves—and not writing good enough songs," insists Brenneck.

In order to reach the apex of the mountain, the band had to come together like never before. Always a brotherhood, the time spent writing and recording Burnt Offerings saw changes that many bands would have run from, but for the Budos presented opportunities to hone their craft. "Making this record reaffirmed that we work together really well," says Profilio.

Burnt Offering breaks from Budos' earlier records in another significant regard: this is their first album without an outside producer. "We had arrived at a different place sonically and needed see it through completely ourselves," says Tankel. They still praise Daptone mastermind Gabriel Roth, who worked alongside Brenneck co-producing their first three records, but parting ways at this juncture made sense.

"We know exactly where we're at," says Profilio. "We didn't want to have to explain ourselves if we were in pursuit of a specific sound or vibe."

"We made the demo that got us picked up by Daptone in my parents' basement when I was eighteen years old," Brenneck recalls. "This album is a continuation of that, fifteen years later … with a lot more records under our belts."

After all that time, Budos has become more than a band—it's a brotherhood. "This is a real family band," says Brenneck. "Guys who've been making music for a long time, and friendships that run completely parallel to the music." They still rehearse religiously almost every week, even if some of those rehearsals encompass just as much drinking, socializing, and listening to music as actual practice.

That camaraderie doesn't evaporate when they put their instruments down. On tour, they hit a brewery or pub for lunch en masse before sound check whenever possible, and like to stir up trouble. There are dust-ups and reconciliations. All that kinship comes to a head when they hit the stage. "We've seen some things out there that most bands don't get a glimpse of these days," suggests Tankel. "All of that craziness just brings us closer together. We couldn't shake each other if we tried."

And capturing the intensity of Budos' electrifying shows on wax, making the grooves vibrate with excitement, was one of the biggest challenges of Burnt Offering. "We record live to tape, with minimal effects," Brenneck says. Nowhere to hide, then. The band insisted that each song push the envelope. No room for filler.

The Budos have traveled far and wide—playing across four continents—since the band's inception. A lifetime of world tours and weekly rehearsals went into the making of Burnt Offering, and the journey is far from over. As long as there are new audiences to thrill and sonic frontiers to explore, they'll forge ahead. "We haven't fulfilled our mission," concludes Profilio. "We're still very hungry."
James McMurtry
James McMurtry
The New York Times Magazine’s cover story “25 Songs That Tell Us Where Music Is Going” (Sunday, March 12) prominently features a four-page spread focusing on James McMurtry’s “Copper Canteen,” from his 2015 release Complicated Game. The author points directly to the song’s frequently quoted opening line as a representative passage in McMurtry’s work: “Honey, don’t you be yelling at me while I’m cleaning my gun.”

“Though that line about the gun got a big laugh when McMurtry played it in Dallas,” Ruth Graham writes, “I still don’t know whether to hear it as a joke or a threat, and McMurtry has never been one to offer the easy comfort of a straight answer.”

Additionally, while many fans consider McMurtry an overtly political songwriter (“We Can’t Make It Here Anymore,” “Cheney’s Toy”), Graham notes that he’s actually more concerned with the effect of policy on personal workaday matters. “McMurtry often writes about how seemingly distant political concerns nudge his characters’ choices and prod their psyches,” she says, “the stretched budget of the Veterans Affairs Department or the birth of a new national park’s consuming the neighbors’ land through eminent domain.”

Read the New York Times Magazine in full here: http://nyti.ms/2mqjFM9.

Those living and visiting Austin during South by Southwest this week will have several chances to catch McMurtry, from his full-band showcase at Mojo Nixon’s Jalapeno Pancake Mayhem at the Continental Club to a solo gig at El Mercado’s Backstage. Fans on the East Coast can see him on his Stateside Solo tour later in March, which launches at the Clementine Cafe in Harrisonburg, Virginia on March 25 and routes throughout the region before concluding at New York City’s City Winery on April 2.

“Nothing makes you miss Waffle House like a couple of weeks in Europe,” says McMurtry, who has been touring abroad recently. “The term ‘Continental Breakfast’ is an oxymoron.”
of Montreal
of Montreal
Two important events occurred during the making of White Is Relic/Irrealis Mood . I became "Simulated Reality" paranoid and I fell in LOVE.

Well a lot more happened during the process of writing and recording, but those are the two big ones. I also reached a healthy point of self-forgiveness for my failed marriage and became deeply educated in the lies of America the Great.

I feel like a switch was recently turned on in my brain and now I'm beginning to see through the lies that have been fed to me my whole life by the masters of media and by those who control and manipulate the narrative of our cultural identity and social order.

My paranoia began during the presidential election cycle and reached a dangerous peak shortly after the inauguration. In the meantime I watched and read countless works of art in a mad effort to be reminded of how many truly brilliant people there are living/struggling among us and to try to maintain a positive outlook. The works of Angela Davis, Noam Chomsky, Chris Kraus, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and the Autobiographies of Malcolm X and Mark E Smith were all great inspirations, to name a few.

Musically, I was very inspired by the extended dance mixes that people used to make for pop singles back in the ‘80s. It's so cool how a lot of the 80's hits had these really intricate and interesting longer versions that wouldn't get played on the radio and could only be heard in the clubs. I used that template with these tracks, I wanted them all to feel like the extended "club edit" of album tracks.

I also decided to abandon the "live band in a room" approach that I had been using on the recent albums and work more on my own or remotely with collaborators. I used the same drum sample packs throughout because I wanted the album to have a rhythmic continuity to it. I wanted the drums to have a strong and consistent identity, similar to how Prince's Linn Electronics LM-1 drum machine played such an important role on his classic albums. Zac Colwell also played a huge role on this album, adding saxophones and synths to most of the songs. I also got a lot of help from long time collaborators, and "of Montreal" touring members, Clayton Rychlik and JoJo Glidewell.

The two title concept came to me when I was thinking about how difficult it is to frame the message of a song with just one title, because so often the songs are about so many different subjects. ‘White Is Relic’ was inspired by James Baldwin’s writings regarding the creation and propagation of a toxic American White identity. I've come to learn how it's just a tool wielded by the 1% to give poor white people a false sense of superiority in an effort to keep the masses placated and numb to how deeply we're all getting fucked by our capitalist rulers. An ‘Irrealis Mood’ is a linguistic indicator that something isn't yet reality but does have the potential to become so.

I'm always searching for new identities so this concept of the death of "Whiteness" appeals to me greatly. Might be the only way to save the world.

-Kevin Barnes, January 2018
Hayes Carll
Hayes Carll
I’m a singer-songwriter.

I think “Lovers and Leavers” comes closer to reflecting that than any other record I’ve made.

I didn’t worry about checking boxes, making sure there was something here for everybody, or getting on the radio.

I just took some much needed deep breaths and let them out on tape.

It’s been a while since my last album by some measurements of time. Not “history of the universe time”, or “getting a bill through congress time”, but in the lives of dogs and recording artists, five years and fifty-three days is only a little less than an eternity.

I went through a divorce. I fell in love.

Changes were made, realizations were realized, and life was lived.

But, I kept on writing songs, on my own and with a cast of accomplished characters who combined their own stories and perspectives with mine.

Songs about my friends.

Songs about my son.

Songs about beginnings and endings.

Songs about songs.

Songs about acceptance and regret.

Songs about lovers and leavers.

With these songs in hand, I needed a co-conspirator to help me get them to you.

I called on Joe Henry, a gentleman poet and an elegant artist who seemed a trustworthy steward for my collection.

We recorded this record live in five days, using just an acoustic guitar, a mix of bass, percussion, pianos and organs, and a touch of pedal steel.

I didn’t have one song that I knew would be a sing along or would make people dance. I felt vulnerable in a way that I hadn’t in a long time. But I got what I wanted – a record with space, nuance, and room to breathe. It felt right for my art. It felt right for my life.

“Lovers and Leavers” isn’t funny or raucous. There are very few hoots and almost no hollers.

But it is joyous, and it makes me smile.

No, it’s not my “Blood on the Tracks,” nor is it any kind of opus.

It’s my fifth record — a reflection of a specific time and place.

It is quiet, like I wanted it to be.

Like I wanted to be.

Hayes Carll
January 1, 2016
Austin, TX.
The Suffers
The Suffers
10-piece female fronted group dubbed The Suffers have put Houston back on the map and brought the world a new sound called Gulf Coast Soul. What began as an all-star group of local Houston musicians, The Suffers quickly became a Houston favorite, playing sold out shows and taking home 20 Houston Press Music Awards. In February of 2015 they embarked on their first national tour with their hit single "Make Some Room", on their independently released debut EP, being played on radio across the country. What the Suffers anticipated as two-week tour turned into 150+ shows across North America, a national television debut on Late Show with David Letterman, a NPR Tiny Desk Concert, a feature in the New York Times and Entertainment Weekly and performances at Newport Folk Festival, Hangout Festival, Austin City Limits, LouFest, Pemberton Festival, VooDoo Festival and many others.

Fast forward to February of 2016 and The Suffers arrive on the Billboard Chart at number 78 when they independent release their debut full length album on Feb 12, 2016. They've since gone on to perform on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah and Jimmy Kimmel Live and did a nationwide sold out tour with Lake Street Dive. The summer of 2016 will see them as festival fan favorites at New Orleans Jazz Fest, Newport Folk Festival, Forecastle, Bottlerock, Afropunk Paris and Afropunk Brooklyn, Electric Forest, Old Settler's, Green River Festival, XPoNential Festival, Denver Day of Rock, Savannah Music Festival, Pilgrimage Festival and the Santa Monica Pier with Mavis Staples.

The Suffers are bassist Adam Castaneda, vocalist/keyboardist Pat Kelly, , guitarist Kevin Bernier, percussionist Jose "Chapy" Luna, and drummer/vocalist Nick Zamora. Trumpet player Jon Durbin, trombonist Michael Razo, Jazz saxophonist Cory Wilson and guitarist/vocalist Alex Zamora and frontwoman Kam Franklin tops off the group with her soaring vocals.
Drivin N Cryin
Drivin N Cryin
Celebrating their 33rd Anniversary together, Atlanta-based folk rock act, Drivin N Cryin, have spent most of 2018 on tour. In October 1985 Drivin N Cryin played their first show at Atlanta’s famed 688 Club. The band quickly gained attention for their blistering live shows, and amassed a rabid fanbase in the fertile soil of the late-1980s Southeast music scene. Now, 33 years later and after releasing four full length albums on Island Records and one on Geffen Records, founding members Kevn Kinney and Tim Nielsen find themselves enjoying a milestone anniversary for the band, having survived the pressures of fame, a shifting musical landscape, multiple lineup changes, and miles of backroads and highways to arrive here.

With a gold record, 10 full-length albums, and a handful of EPs to their credit, the band still refuses to rest. In 2012, a documentary about the band entitled Scarred but Smarter: Life n Times of Drivin' N’ Cryin' was produced. In 2015, a collection of 10 choice cuts from the band’s 4-EP “Songs” series, entitled Best of Songs, was released on Nashville’s Plowboy Records.

Additionally, the band was inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame the same year. The following year, Drivin N Cryin released a vinyl-only album, entitled Archives Vol One, with a collection of basement recordings from the years 1988 to 1990.

With Dave V. Johnson as their drummer, and the band's newest member Laur Joamets (originally Sturgill Simpson) now being added to the lineup, Drivin N Cryin is continuing to tour the U.S. to great acclaim.

Island Records re-released their much celebrated “Mystery Road” album through Universal Music Group (2017) & Darius Rucker cut “Straight to Hell” on his new album, “When Was the Last Time”, released October 2017 with guest vocal appearances by Luke Bryan, Charles Kelley, and Jason Aldean. “Mystery Road” was recently named one of The 50 Best Southern Rock Albums of All Time by Paste Magazine.

A quote from the band’s lead singer, Kevn Kinney, gives a little insight into what Drivin N Cryin is all about: “We are a band that's like your record collection.” Drawing influence from a wide array of musical elements, Drivin N Cryin has developed a unique sound over the years.

Their name derives from the eclectic nature of this sound: a little drivin' rock n roll and a little country twang. Comfortable with their past and confident in their future, the band has an arsenal of songs, a full tank of gas, and no plans of stopping any time soon.
UNKNOWN HINSON
UNKNOWN HINSON
While singing his own hilariously politically incorrect songs, Unknown Hinson plays guitar in a style incendiary enough to have Satan himself reaching for the antiperspirant. But don't dismiss him as a novelty act. He's one hell of a talent and has the music to prove it!

Looking somewhat like Dracula's nasty little brother who spent some hard years drinking and working as a carnival barker for a second-rate freak show, Unknown Hinson translates that vibe to his style of country and western-tinged psychobilly. The band is now touring nationwide, wowing audiences with outrageous and campy, white-trash persona and freewheeling, sleazy tone.
Hinson's most recent CD release, "Live and Undead", melds weepy twang, searing guitar riffs and lyrics that speak of love-gone-bad. Recorded at a sold-out show, an enthusiastic honky tonk crowd sings along with the King on every song. Raucous, theatrical and over-the-top, Unknown Hinson isn't just for the trailer park set anymore! Unknown is gaining international notoriety in the 14-34 demographic as the voice of lead character "Early Cuyler" in the popular show from Cartoon Network - "Squidbillies". The first four seasons were so well-received that an immediate green light was given to future seasons. Check website for dates and time slots.

Unknown Hinson is an international winner in the Independent Music Awards for his alternative Country track "Torture Town" from the album "Target Practice".

Unknown Hinson is also a featured artist for Reverend Guitars, representing them in many issues of Guitar Player magazine. A signature Unknown Hinson guitar is currently part of Reverend's celebrity instrument lineup. Full page interviews and photos of Unknown are in March and April 2012 issues of Guitar Player, and on guitarplayer.com www.reverendguitars.com

Upon his first performance at Rockabilly Revival, an annual festival in Austin, Tx, Rockabilly Magazine named Unknown Hinson as their "Find of the Year" www.rockabillymagazine.com

Check out YouTube for thousands of videos from various sources featuring the King of Country Western Troubadours.www.youtube.com/unknownhinson
Kurtis Blow
Kurtis Blow
Kurtis Blow was born Kurtis Walker in Harlem in 1959
The first rapper to sign with a major record label, was instrumental in bringing rap from the underground to the masses. He began to immerse himself in the newborn hip-hop culture in the early '70s; in 1976, he enrolled at City College of New York, where he became program director at the college's radio station. During his college years, Blow fell in with a group of friends, acquaintances and collaborators that would become the core of early-'80s hip-hop. Blow worked with, among others, Grandmaster Flash, Russell Simmons and Mele Mel. After college, Blow embarked on his music career with Simmons as his manager and Simmons's younger brother Joey (who was once called 'son of Kurtis Blow' and was later known as Run) working the turntables. In 1979, Blow recorded "Christmas Rapping," a novelty single co-written by Billboard columnist Rocky Ford. The song was a hit, landing Blow a contract with Mercury Records. Later that year, Blow released his landmark "The Breaks," included on Blow's self-titled debut. The record was a major success both within the hip-hop community and outside, with certified gold sales. It earned Blow a place in the pantheon of influential early rappers. Blow's early success was followed by a dry period in the early '80s, when his Deuce and Tough albums failed to dent the charts. However, things picked up in 1984 with the release of the Ego Trip album, which featured the single "Basketball." The next year, Blow made his film debut in Krush Groove. Blow's production work for artists such as Sweet G was also getting notice: He was named Producer of the Year in New York for three consecutive years (1983-85). However, Blow's career took a significant downturn thereafter. His 1986 album, 'Kingdom Blow', was a commercial and critical flop, as was 1988's misnamed 'Back by Popular Demand'. As his recording career wound down, Blow expanded his production work and became one of the first rappers to infiltrate mainstream television, appearing in commercials for Sprite in 1986 and writing rap segments for the soap opera "One Life to Live" in 1991-92.
Sierra Hull
Sierra Hull
This is the turning point.

This is where a preternatural talent becomes a natural woman.

This is Sierra Hull’s Weighted Mind. It is nothing like what we thought it would be. It is nothing like what we’ve heard before, from anyone. It is singular and emphatic, harmonious and dissonant. It is the realization of promise, and the affirmation of individuality. It is born of difficulty and indecision, yet it rings with ease, decisiveness, and beauty.

“She plays the mandolin with a degree of refined elegance and freedom that few have achieved,” says Bela Fleck, the genre-leaping banjo master who produced Weighted Mind. “And now her vocals and songwriting have matured to the level of her virtuosity.”

Alison Krauss, who has won more Grammy awards than any female artist in history, says of Hull, “I think she’s endless. I don’t see any boundaries. Talent like hers is so rare, and I don’t think it stops. It’s round.”

Hull came to us as a bluegrass thrush, a teen prodigy. Krauss called her to the Grand Ole Opry stage when Hull was 11-years-old. Two years later, she signed with Rounder Records, and soon became known as a remarkable mandolin player, a tone-true vocalist, and a recording artist of high order. She made two acclaimed albums. She played the White House, and Carnegie Hall, and the Kennedy Center, and she became the first bluegrass musician to receive a Presidential Scholarship at the Berklee College of Music.

She was celebrated, yet adrift. Stranded, even.

What she felt at 22 was not what she felt at 12, and the music Sierra Hull was writing and playing at home was different from the music she was making on stages.

“In some way, I was needing to run from the thing that everybody thought I was being,” she says now, at 24.

But she wasn’t running so much as plodding.

She fielded myriad opinions about hypothetical courses. She grew vulnerable, and weighted, and she wrote songs about all of that. She found solace in an antique Brenda Ueland book that advised, “Everybody is original, if he tells the truth, if he speaks from himself.”

And she talked with Krauss, the childhood hero who had become an adult confidante.

“Sierra did well in music very fast and very young,” says Krauss. “Sometimes when that happens, people don’t want you to change. It’s, ‘We know you as this, and now you’re scaring us.’ But there wasn’t a question about what she wanted. She just needed somebody to listen to her and say, ‘What you have to say is valuable. If this is what you feel and what you want to say, you wait until you get to say it.’”Krauss also suggested she talk with Fleck.

“Sierra lives in the border area where new ideas mix to create hybrids, and sometimes brand new directions,” he says. “Her own voice was quietly telling her something that was hard to hear over all the advice she was getting.” Fleck asked her to play him her new songs, without accompaniment: Just voice and mandolin.

“Even when I was fronting a band, I’d always been an ensemble player,” Hull says. “To do something by myself made me rethink everything.”

And so she rethought, and she found new ways to play the new songs she’d written. In short time, what had been arduous now seemed genuine and innate. C.S. Lewis’ quote about how “the longest way round is the shortest way home” made sense. And a dazzling and atypical album was made possible.

Hull’s songs did not remain bare of all but mandolin and voice, though those are the essential elements here. Bass marvel Ethan Jodziewicz came on, providing resonance and rhythmic complexity. Fleck’s banjo adorns the courtly “Queen of Hearts/Royal Tea.” And Krauss, Abigail Washburn and Rhiannon Giddens add enchanting harmonies.

Bluegrass roots inform and inspire this soundscape, but bluegrass does not define or limit Weighted Mind. This is not bluegrass music, or chamber music, or pop music. This is original music, from a virtuoso who tells the truth and speaks from herself.

“If you won’t go where I’m going, then I’ll have to go alone,” she sings. “Choices and changes/ I’m tired of trying to be someone else.” Then she unleashes an octave mandolin solo—first fluttering, then tense and troubled—that could come from no one else.

Hull wrote eleven of Weighted Mind’s twelve songs (and she arranged the twelfth tune), penning some with co-writers Jon Weisberger, Zac Bevill, and Josh Shilling, and writing “Stranded,” “Wings of the Dawn,” “Birthday,” “Lullaby,” “I’ll Be Fine,” and “Black River” on her own.

“The moment you start to be yourself, there’s an honesty about that, that people connect with,” she says. “This album feels like the story of my early twenties, of that searching. Now, it feels like everything worked out the way it was supposed to.”

“I’d like to say to you, ‘Come follow,’” Hull sings on “Compass.” “But you may find my heart’s been hollowed out.”

Now, she knows. If her heart was hollowed, it was only so it might be filled anew, and then revealed. Welcome to a Weighted Mind, at ease.
Venue Information:
The Grey Eagle
185 Clingman Ave
Asheville, NC, 28801
http://www.thegreyeagle.com/